The Passover holiday is one of the most important religious holidays celebrated by Jews all around the world, and its history and significance date back thousands of years. The holiday commemorates the Israelites’ exodus out of Egypt when God freed them from slavery and oppression.

Passover begins on 15th day of the Jewish month of Nissan and lasts for seven or eight days. During this time, Jews around the world gather with family and friends to celebrate and retell the story of Israelites’ liberation. Seder, a unique ceremony celebrated on the first two evenings of Passover, is the highlight of the holiday. From cooking traditional meals, telling the inspiring story of Israelites’ departure from Egypt, singing songs and praises, to saying special prayers, everyone forms a special spiritual connection at the Seder. Among the most famous meals served is matzah, or unleavened bread, which symbolizes the bread the Israelites ate when they fled Egypt.

The celebration of Passover comes with a key message – the will to persevere with faith against all odds. Moreover, it is a time to reflect on the past, celebrate freedom, and look ahead to the future. Recognizing the true meaning of this symbolic festival, we can “identify with the freedom God gave to the Israelites,” as Holladay stated. While the rituals and traditions may vary from family to family, the spirit of Passover is the same: a time of freedom, renewal, and hope. In other words, this festival is as much a celebration of our spiritual freedom as the physical liberation from slavery.